Resources

hippoRENT - Server & Router Guide


The hippoRENT sits at the middle of your rental network, allowing you to monitor and control up to 40 rental boxes and 12 vendors at once. Note that you can of course use rental boxes without the server, but by using a server you can save yourself lots of running about.

When you rez a server, if it has boxes or vendors in its database, it will offer to reconnect to those. (e.g. transmit its key, which changes on rez, to them, replacing any other server key they hold). This means that if you accidentally take a server into inventory, you can repair your network. (We don’t recommend deliberately using this method to relocate your server; this is because that if you use this technique, the boxes and vendors will end up with a different server key in memory than in their configuration notecards; hence if you reset them, they’ll forget the server. In simple terms: you want to avoid as far as possible de-rezzing and rezzing a server, it leads to lots of problems.)

Please note that the server is fully modable, but be careful unlinking things, as you may break it. Stick to texturing and resizing it, unless you know what you are doing!

This document describes four things:

1. Every possible option you can specify in the server’s configuration notecard
2. All the menu commands provided by the server
3. The voice commands that the server understands
4. Serving remote configuration notecards to rental boxes and vendors

Please note that this document does not cover the web-enabled hippoRENT servers; for information on those, see the ‘Using the Web Plugin System’ document.


1. Configuring a Server using the Configuration Notecard

Editing the Configuration Notecard allows you to control several options. Once you’re done editing, save it then click the server and choose "Reset" from the menu that appears. If you’ve typed any wrong commands, these will be reported as the notecard is loaded. Please note that if you want your managers to be able to edit configuration notecards, you will need to grant them the necessary modification rights. This is a Second Life topic, beyond the scope of this notecard.

There now follows a brief description of each possible notecard option.


NAME: <text>
e.g. NAME: My Rental Server
- The name of the server box appears in messages and email reports.
* For Advanced Users: If you wish to simply have the server use the name of the server object you’ve rezzed, use NAME: <object> (include the < and >). Each time you rename the server object, you can now simply click it to have it’s virtual name, as it were, update accordingly.


SHOW NAME: <Yes/No>
e.g. SHOW NAME: Yes
- Should the server name appear in hovertext above the server? Can be useful if you’re using several servers and wish to easily distinguish between them.


HOVERTEXT COLOUR: <colour>
e.g. HOVERTEXT COLOUR: red
- Sets the colour to use for hovertext; the server knows the colour names red, green, yellow, blue, pink, black, white.
* For advanced users: You can also use a colour vector instead, e.g. HOVERTEXT COLOUR: <0.4, 0.3, 0.2>. To read about how colour vectors work in Second Life, see e.g http://rpgstats.com/wiki/index.php?title=Color or search at forums.secondlife.com for advice.


PASSWORD: <text>
e.g. PASSWORD: topsecret
- Provide a password to protect network traffic between boxes, servers and vendors. It is theoretically possible if you have no password for a clever hacker to send messages to your server and cause mischief. However, use a password and this becomes impossible and the network 100% secure. Make sure you set EXACTLY the same password in each rental box, server and vendor otherwise communication will fail and you’ll get an error message. Passwords are case sensitive, so ’secret’ is not the same as ’Secret’.


OTHER MANAGERS: <names>
e.g. OTHER MANAGERS: Kermit Frog, Miss Piggy, Pathfinder Linden
- If you’d like other managers to be able to use the menu and voice commands, list each name here, separated by a comma. Please note that if you wish your managers to be able to edit the configuration notecard, then this requires you you to grant them the necessary modification rights (see the Second Life Knowledge Base if you don’t know how to do this).


EMAIL REPORTS TO: <email address>
e.g. EMAIL REPORTS TO: controlfreak@landbaron.co.uk
- If you would like the server to send regular summary reports on your rental business to an offworld email address, specify it here. You can also use multiple email addresses if you wish, simply by separating them with commas (e.g. EMAIL REPORTS TO: sandip@chocolateisnice.ac.uk, jemima@yayitsfriday.com).


EMAIL REPORTS EVERY: <time in hours>
e.g. EMAIL REPORTS EVERY: 48
- If you would like regular email reports, specify the frequency in hours you’d like them sent.


DISABLE REGION SAY: <Yes/No>
e.g. DISABLE REGION SAY: Yes
- Rental boxes, vendors and servers in the same region will communicate by chat (well, llRegionSay() to be precise) as well as email, making communication more effective when Second Life is being slow and sticky (which never happens, huh?) There is a very, very small performance hit for this, as devices need to maintain a listener. If you don't wish to take advantage of this and would prefer to kill the listener script, use DISABLE REGION SAY: Yes to turn it off.


(v5 and above only) REPORT INVALID EMAIL DETAIL: <Yes/No>
e.g. REPORT INVALID EMAIL DETAIL: Yes
- Turn this on and the details of any object (e.g. box, vendor) that tries to email your server and which has the wrong password set in its Configuration Notecard will have details reported on it to you; e.g. "hippoRENT Server: @ Hippo Technologies (186, 128, 500) reports: email received with a password that does not match mine ('mypassword') ... Object-Name: hippoRENT Rental Box w/plugin; Object-Location: Pax Hipponia (23, 42, 31)".
See here for more details.


Finally, those of you using the rental system to manage land and tier, you can change the language that the server uses so it’s more appropriate to tier payments and estate management. The default server has this command in its configuration notecard:

TERMINOLOGY: Landlord, Tenant, Rent, Rental, Plot, Rental box

This determines the language used in menus and messages. If you were managing an estate and people were paying for land/tier, you might use something lke this instead:

TERMINOLOGY: Estate Owner, Land Owner, Tier, Contract, Land parcel, Tier management box

As you can see, each word/phrase should start with a capital letter. The terminology you choose gets used in most messages and menus throughout, allowing you to more easily customise a hippoRENT server to what it is you’re renting/leasing/hiring/collecting money for.



2. Menu Commands

STATUS
Reports the status of the server, the size of the databases, memory available etc.

BOXES
Opens the box menu, giving a number of sub-commands:

  • RESET LIST - resets the box database and asks each rental box to identify itself afresh. Use this command if you’ve deleted a rental box, for example. The server runs this command itself, automatically, once a day.

  • LIST BOXES - displays a list of each known rental box, together with a few important bits of information about it. If a rental box has prim counting turned on; three counts will be listed --- A(ll prims); G(roup prims); T(enant’s prims). An !! symbol after a count indicates this is the count the box has been told to watch and that it has gone past the prim limit on this tenancy.
    * Time Saving Tip: Click the vendor LCD counter on the front of the server to quickly display this list.

  • MAP - show a rental box on the map. You’ll be asked to type the number of the rental box you wish to see, then tap the server again to have it appear on the map for you to teleport to, for example.

  • COMMAND - send a command to a rental box. You’ll be asked to type the rental box number you wish to send the command to, or ALL to send it to every box. You can then choose from:

    • VOICE CMD (send a voice command to a given box, perhaps a configuration option)
    • PAYMENTS (list payments made to a box, reset payment history);
    • RESERVE (reserve a box for a person);
    • UNRESERVE (remove a reservation); LOCK (lock a box so it can’t be paid); UNLOCK (unlock a box so it can be paid);
    • STATUS (print a box status report);
    • EDIT (change the tenant or their length of tenancy);
    • REFUND (remove a tenant and refund them);
    • BOOT (kick out a tenant without a refund).

      Please note that a few of these commands can only be sent to single boxes (reserve/edit/refund) ... after all, you wouldn’t want to reserve 20 boxes for one person, would you now?

      * Important Note - All of these instructions can also be sent by voice command, which is often a quicker and more flexible way of doing it. See the section on voice commands later in this notecard.

  • PROFIT - run a profitability report on all the boxes that the server knows about. This is described in more detail below under voice commands.

VENDORS
Opens the vendors menu, offering these sub-commands:

  • RESET LIST - resets the vendors database and asks each vendor to identify itself afresh. Use this command if you’ve deleted a vendor, for example. Note that the server runs this command itself, automatically, once a day.

  • LIST ALL - display a list of each known vendor, together with a few important bits of information about it.
    * Time Saving Tip: Click the vendor LCD counter on the front of the server to quickly display this list.

  • MAP - shows a vendor on the map. See the information on this command above, under the boxes section.

  • UPDATE - forces all vendors to reset and load the up to date list of boxes afresh from this server.

  • VOICE CMD - send a voice command (e.g. a configuration command, such as ’hovertext colour: red’) to a given vendor.

SERVER KEY
Speaks the key of this server, so you can then copy it from chat history and use it in the configuration notecards of boxes and vendors.

OPTIONS
Opens the options menu, offering these choices:

  • SHOW NAME - turn the server name display on.
  • HIDE NAME - turn the server name display off.
  • TEXT COLOUR - allows you to pick one of several basic colours for the hovertext display.

RESET
Resets the server and reloads its configuration notecard. You will also have the option at the same time to reset the list of boxes, vendors or both. (Resetting these lists asks each rental box or vendor to identify itself afresh to the server.)

HELP
Opens the first of the help notecards.


3. Voice Commands

The server can handle an extensive collection of voice commands. These fall into two types --- commands to the server itself and commands that the server will send to boxes or vendors. To issue a voice command, either click the server and choose "Voice Cmd" from the menu, or click the round Hippo Technologies logo on the front of the server.


3.1 Commands to the Server

SCAN
Displays a list of up to 16 avatars standing within 10m of the server along with their keys. Useful if you need somebody’s key for rent sharing. (The rental box also has this feature).

EMAIL REPORT NOW
Send the email report (a list of boxes and tenants) now to the email address(es) specified in the configuration notecard.

EMAIL REPORT NOW TO <address>
e.g. EMAIL REPORT NOW TO rabbits@greymammals.com
Send an email report to the address specified. You can also use multiple email addresses if you wish, simply by separating them with commas (e.g. EMAIL REPORT NOW TO: fred@ilovehamsters.co.uk, jane@handsoffmylemming.com).

LIST BOXES
Displays a list of each known box, together with a few important bits of information about it. This command can be filtered (see below for more information), so to list every box with a tenant you could use:
e.g. list boxes [rented]

LIST VENDORS
Displays a list of each known vendor. Again, this can be filtered if you wish (see below for more information). So to list every vendor in a sim called ’Westmorland’: list vendors [westmorland]

PROFIT (or if you prefer the long version: PROFITABILITY)
Runs the Profitability Wizard. This will ask you to input how much land you own (see World -> About My Land) and how much monthly tier you are paying. It will then list all of your rental boxes and for each one give you a wealth of financial data:

  • The break-even price (how much you should be renting this parcel for to break-even)

  • The maximum monthly income (L$ and US$) you could get from this parcel (e.g. if it’s rented the whole month)

  • How much the parcel is costing you each month (in L$ and US$).
    * Note For Advanced Users: this is calculated by this formula: tier paid per prim x prims on parcel.

  • The profit or loss you’re therefore making on it (in L$ and US$)

  • Finally, the percentage profit or loss you’re making (profit/loss as a percentage of cost)

Once you get the hang of this powerful tool, it can help you check that you’re charging the right amount for each of your rentals.

Note, you can also filter this command. So to check the profit margins on your rented boxes: profit [rented]

GIVE <part of notecard name>
e.g. GIVE config ... to get a copy of the server’s configuration notecard
If you want to examine some of the contents of the server, this is a quicker way to do it than editing it and examining things via the contents tab (although you can’t make and save changes this way). You can also use GIVE NOTECARDS to see a copy of every notecard in the server.

RECONNECT <key of box>
e.g. RECONNECT c0f06c89-71c2-7537-a4e3-495c3cc0b336
If a given box has lost touch with the server, you can send a reconnect request to it remotely. (Box keys can be given by clicking the box, choosing Voice Cmd and typing ’box key’). This command will probably never have to be used unless a major Second Life grid crash effects your network; it is one more diagnostic tool.

SERVER KEY
Reports the key of the server. You can then copy it from chat history and use it in the configuration notecards of your boxes and vendors.

VERSION
Reports the current version of the server software that you are using.


3.2 Commands to Rental Boxes

To send a command to a specific box, use the format BOX <number> <command>. So, for example, BOX 3 BOOT or BOX 17 RESERVE Fred Bloggs. The box number is the number shown next to a box when you ask the server to list its boxes.

You can also use BOXES <command> to send a command to every box. So, for example, BOXES LOCK. If you choose to do this, you can also use filtering to select which boxes to command. To add a filter, enclose a piece of text in square brackets that a box’s description, tenant, location, prim count, or price must include. (Filters are not case sensitive). Here are some examples:

boxes [andy] boot
- Sends the boot command to every box with the word "andy" in it (having the effect of booting any tenant of that name).

boxes [cowell] lock
- Send the lock command to every box with the word "cowell" in it (having the effect of locking every box in that sim).

... etc

Note, you can put the filter text anywhere in the command, just make sure the square brackets are correct. So:

boxes kill [rented]
boxed [rented] kill
[rented] kill boxes

... are all equivalent.

There are some other clever tricks you can do. You may have noted when listing boxes that those whose prims are being counted and which have exceeded their prim count have !! displayed after the prim count. So you can issue a command like:

boxes list [!!]
...
to show a list of boxes over their prim count

You can also use [rented] and [unrented] to filter by tenant or no tenant. So, for example:

boxes [unrented] config price per week: 200
... to set the price of any boxes without tenants to L$200 per week.

Filtering commands are an extremely powerful tool. Take the opportunity to play with them to see just what you can achieve. Here is a list of all the commands that boxes can be sent:

COMMAND
e.g. box 2 command
- Opens the server’s command menu ready to send a command to that box. (Every command in that menu has an equivalent voice command; but this is useful if you’ve forgotten which one you want).

STATUS
e.g. boxes [!!] status
- Obtain a status report (price, prims, tenancy details). In the example above, you would be requesting a status report from every box over its prim count.

LOCK
e.g. box 3 lock
- Locks a box so it cannot be paid.

UNLOCK
e.g. boxes unlock
- Unlocks a box so it can receive payments again.

RESERVE <name>
e.g. box 29 reserve Pony Linden
- Reserves a box for the specified person. (Note you must type their name exactly as it appears in Second Life). Remember that you can also reserve boxes for members of the same group as the box is set to; do this with e.g. box 13 reserve group.

UNRESERVE
e.g. boxes unreserve
- Clears any reservation on a box.

RESERVATION LENGTH <number of days>
e.g. box 2 reservation length 4
- Set the length of a reservation (you need to provide a reservation name before using this command). After that number of days have elapsed, the reservation will be cleared so that anybody can rent. Note, to keep the reservation but remove the days counter, use a reservation length of 0.

BOOT
e.g. boxes [rented] boot
- Remove a tenant without any refund.
* For Advanced Users: You can also the command “boot silent” to remove a tenant without telling them; e.g. box 13 boot silent.

PAYMENTS <list/erase/totals>
e.g. box 1 payments list
e.g. box 34 payments erase
e.g. boxes payments totals
- Use the ’list’ suffix to get a list of up to 15 last payments and refunds into or out of a box. Or use ’totals’ to just get the grand total of payments, without the individual data. Finally, you can use the ’erase’ suffix to reset a box’s payment history

CONFIG
e.g. box 1 config hovertext colour: red
e.g. boxes [ambleside] config price per week: 150
- This is a special command that tells the box that what follows is a configuration command. Thus you can alter the configuration of your boxes, remotely, without having to visit them. Please be aware that should you ever tell a box to reload its configuration notecard, any details set via voice commands will get overridden.

KILL
e.g. box [my first rental box] kill
- Tells a box to self destruct. Very useful if you do something foolish with building tools and bury a box 30m underground. As long as it is still talking to the server, you can kill it. Be aware, of course, that this command cannot be undone, so use it very carefully. After using this command, you will need to reset the list of boxes on the server.

SHARED
e.g box 17 shared
- Get a list of who a rental box is sharing rental income payments with.

UNSHARE <part of name>
e.g. box 13 unshare pathfinder
- Tell a box to remove any payments shared with the person whose name matches the text you’ve given. In the example above, box 13 would stop sharing (if it was) payments with Pathfinder Linden or Doug Pathfinder.

UPDATE
e.g. boxes update
- Ask a box to update the server with all its latest details. Boxes automatically talk to the server every 2 hours (or when paid), but if you desire an update in the meantime, you can force it this way.

NOTECARD
e.g. box 12 notecard
- Request a box gives you a copy of its tenant notecards.

GIVE
e.g. box 14 give pictures
- Send a ’give’ request (see the voice commands section of the rental box guide) to a box. Using this you can see any notecard inside it (e.g. box 1 give config ... gets the configuration notecard) or also any picture. You can also send GIVE NOTECARDS to get all notecards or GIVE PICTURES all pictures inside a rental box or boxes.

SET FREE <number of days>
e.g. box 13 set free 7
- Set the number of free days counter on a box. See the rental box guide for information on how free days work.
* NOTE: Setting free days like this does not increase the rental time; it only tells the box how much of the current rental period is free and non-refundable. To change the actual rental period use the LENGTH command below.

CLEAR free
e.g. boxes [rented] clear free
- Clear the free days counter on a box.

RESET
e.g. boxes reset
- Instructs a rental box to reload its configuration notecard. Please note, this will overwrite any configuration options you have set with voice commands.

(v5 and above only) LOAD <box data>
e.g. box 1 load Pathfinder Linden^12^2006-12-14^37982^0e9fd382-7f9b-4ea4-8cb8-4228747b04bc^0
Load a new box with the tenancy details of an old one. The parameters must be the contents of another box's description field which you have copied or obtained using the INFO command below.

(v5 and above only) INFO
e.g. box 3 info
Asks the box to send you the tenancy data; it will look like a string of data items separated by the ^ symbol, e.g. Pathfinder Linden^12^2006-12-14^37982^0e9fd382-7f9b-4ea4-8cb8-4228747b04bc^0 -- you can use this with the LOAD command (above) to load a tenancy directly onto a box.

(v5 and above only) MESSAGE <message text>
e.g. box 1 message Hello, little tenant!
- Send a message to the tenants on the box you’ve selected.
* There are some advanced options with the message command: see here for more detail.

(v5 and above only) TIME <hh:mm:ss> (or TIME dd:hh:mm:ss)
e.g. BOX 2 TIME 20:40:32
e.g. BOX 4 TIME 12:19:30:00
- Set the length of the current tenancy *to the second*.
* To change the time part of the tenancy and leave the days outstanding alone, simply leave off the days part of the input and just enter hours:minutes:seconds.
* To change just the days part of the tenancy, use the length command instead.

(v5 and above only) VERSION
e.g. box 9 version
- Ask the box to report what version of the rental box software it’s running.

There are also a few voice commands that can only be sent to one box at a time.

MAP
e.g. box 12 map
- Show a given box on the map. You will be asked to touch the server afterwards to complete the command (this is due to the way Second Life deals with map requests in its scripting language).

REFUND
e.g. box 12 refund
- Displays the refund menu, allowing you to quickly refund a tenant. You can also specify whether you wish to refund outstanding days or weeks and thus bypass a menu; so, for example: "box 1 refund days", "box 33 refund weeks", or "box 22 refund months".

TENANT <name>
e.g. box 12 tenant Fred Bloggs
- Set the tenant on a given box.

LENGTH <rental length in days>
e.g. box 32 length 12
- Set the days left on a box’s tenancy.
* For Advanced Users: You can set the length in various ways, so all of these will work: LENGTH 12; LENGTH +3; LENGTH -4; LENGTH +20%; LENGTH -15%; LENGTH 50%.

PRICE <price in L$>
e.g. box 40 price 150
- Adjust the price a box is charging. (Note this command doesn’t change the unit (day/week/month), for that use e.g. PRICE PER WEEK: 150).
* For Advanced Users: You can set the price in various ways, so all of these will work: PRICE 150; PRICE +30; PRICE -40; PRICE +25%; PRICE -15%; PRICE 50%.



3.3 Commands to Vendors

To send a command to a specific vendor, use the format VENDOR <number> <command>. So, for example, VENDOR 3 RESET or VENDOR 1 CONFIG HOVERTEXT COLOR: RED. The vendor number is the number shown next to a vendor when you ask the server to list its vendors.

You can also use VENDORS <command> to send a command to every vendor. If you do this, you can also filter your command, in the same way as described above for boxes:

e.g. VENDORS [ambleside] KILL
... to delete every vendor in the Ambleside sim.

Note that commands to vendors are not case sensitive, so ’vendor 2 reset’ is the same as ’Vendor 2 Reset’.

These are the commands you can send to a vendor:

GIVE
e.g. vendor 14 give pictures
- Send a ’give’ request (see the vendor guide for more information) to a vendor. Using this you can see any notecard inside it (e.g. vendor 1 give config ... gets the configuration notecard) or also any picture. You can also use GIVE NOTECARDS and GIVE PICTURES to get every item of that kind.

CONFIG
e.g. vendor 1 config hovertext colour: red
e.g. vendors [ambleside] show rented: yes
- This is a special command that tells the vendor that what follows is a configuration command. Thus you can alter the configuration of your vendors, remotely, without having to visit them. Please be aware that should you ever tell a vendor to reload its configuration notecard, any details set via voice commands will get overridden.

RESET
e.g. vendors reset
- Instructs a vendor to reload its configuration notecard. Please note, this will overwrite any configuration options you have set with voice commands.

(v5 and above only) VERSION
e.g. vendor 3 version
- Ask the vendor to report what version of the rental vendor software it’s running.

KILL
e.g. vendor [my little vendor] kill
- Tells a vendor to self destruct. Very useful if you do something foolish with building tools and bury a vendor 30m underground. As long as it is still talking to the server, you can kill it. Be aware, of course, that this command cannot be undone, so use it very carefully. After using this command, you should instruct the server to reset its list of vendors.

There is one final command that can only be sent to one vendor at a time ...

MAP
e.g. vendor 4 map
- Show a given vendor on the map. You will be asked to touch the server afterwards to complete the command (this is due to the way Second Life deals with map requests in its scripting language).


4. Serving Remote Configuration Notecards using a Server or Router

The final thing the server can do for you is to serve configuration notecards to your boxes and vendors. Why might you want to do this? One can think of several reasons:

  • You have a mall with 40 identical shops for rent that only differ in their name. By putting the configuration notecard into the server, you can save a lot of work; rather than editing 40 cards whenever you have a change, you can just edit the card in the server, then issue a ’boxes reset’ command to tell all the boxes to reload it.

  • You can keep all your configuration cards in one place; thus if you need to do some editing, you can do so from one location, rather than having to zip around the grid.

It is also possible to have boxes or vendors load part of their configuration from their own card and part from the server. Hence you can set specific box information (e.g. the rental name) locally and general data (price, prims, tenancy settings etc.) via a card on the server.

Setting up remote configuration cards is a breeze. Simply follow these steps. In this example, we’ll set up a rental box, but the same would apply to a vendor.

  1. Begin by saving the configuration card you wish to send out onto the server. Note, you cannot call it ’Configuration Notecard’ as that will clash with the server’s own card. In this example, we will call it ‘My Box Settings’. Don’t include SERVER KEY or PASSWORD commands on this notecard; they still have to reside in the box or vendor (otherwise how could it contact the server for the card?)

  2. On the rental box, edit its configuration notecard and use this command:

LOAD REMOTE: My Box Settings

Important Note: this command must come after the SERVER KEY and PASSWORD commands, otherwise your box won’t be able to talk to the server. Simply put: your rental box will work through its own configuration notecard until it comes to the LOAD REMOTE command. It will then fetch that card from the server and process that. This allows you to put some data on one card and some on the other.

  1. Save the box’s configuration card, click the box and choose ’Reset’. Wait and see if it works (the box will feedback on its progress).

Some Important Caveats!

If server is in the same sim as the rental box, it will GIVE a copy of the card to the rental box, REPLACING any item with the SAME NAME in the rental box’s inventory. So don’t, for example, call the remote card the same name as a script in the rental box. That would be very silly.

If the server is a different sim to the rental box, then the server cannot give the card (due to Second Life limits). Instead, the server will use prim-to-prim email and send configuration lines, one at a time. This is much slower (although blank lines and comments do, of course, not get sent). If your box and server are in different sims, you can speed up the process in one of two ways:

  • Only set things in the remote configuration notecard you really need. Do you really want all those custom messages, for example?

  • If you’ve got several boxes in sim A and your server in sim B, consider using a HippoTech Router. This is included in your product carton and does nothing more than serve configuration notecards to objects in the same sim). This is how to use a router:

    - Rez it in the same sim as the boxes you’d like it to serve notecards to.

    - Edit its configuration card; you’ll find it contains a very simple set of commands:

HOVERTEXT: <text>
e.g. HOVERTEXT: My Shiny Router
- Any text you wish to float over the router to identify it. You can leave this blank if you wish.

HOVERTEXT COLOUR: <colour>
e.g. HOVERTEXT COLOUR: red
- Sets the colour to use for hovertext; the server knows the colour names red, green, yellow, blue, pink, black, white.
* For advanced users: You can also use a colour vector instead, e.g. HOVERTEXT COLOUR: <0.4, 0.3, 0.2>.

SERVER KEY: <key>
e.g. SERVER KEY: c0f06c89-71c2-7537-a4e3-495c3cc0b336
- Insert the key of your server here so that the router box can talk to it.

PASSWORD: <text>
e.g. PASSWORD: topsecret
- Provide a password to protect network traffic between boxes, servers and vendors. Make sure you set the same password as the server or communications will fail.

OTHER MANAGERS: <names>
e.g. OTHER MANAGERS: Fred Bloggs
- If you’d like other managers to be able to click the router and get its status, list each name here, separated by a comma. Note, if you wish your managers to be able to edit the configuration notecard, then this requires you you to grant them the necessary modification rights (see the Second Life Knowledge Base if you don’t know how to do this).

ON FAIL TRY SERVER: <Yes/No>
e.g. ON FAIL TRY SERVER: No
- Should the router pass on requests to the server if it can’t meet them?

- Now save the router’s configuration card, which the router will then reload automatically.

- Click the router to get its key.

- Edit the configuration card of the rental box to read:

LOAD REMOTE: <card name> FROM <router key>
e.g. LOAD REMOTE: My Little Card FROM c0f06c89-71c2-7537-a4e3-495c3cc0b336

When you reload the box’s configuration card, it will contact the router. If the router is (a) in the same sim and (b) has the card you’ve requested, it will give it. Otherwise, it will pass on the request to the server (if you’ve set this) or tell the box it has failed and force the standard configuration card to load.

REMEMBER:
Put general configuration data on remote cards if you’re using them (e.g. price) but put box-specific items (e.g. rental names) on the local cards. Anything on a local card before the REMOTE LOAD command will be processed before the remote card is loaded; so if you’re clever, you can carefully control what is unique to each box and what is general.

And, of course, everything we have said about for remote loading applies to vendors as well as to boxes. Vendors can load remote configurations in just the same way.



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